Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Bookshelf Tag II

I do love me some book tags, and Liz from Out of Coffee, Out of Mind was kind enough to tag me for her update to the Bookshelf Tour Tag. Thanks, Liz!


The Rules (of the original tag):
  • The book(s) you answer with must be from your bookshelf.
  • Include a picture of your bookshelf, if possible, or you could include pictures of your dream shelf. 
via Goodreads
a short but powerful book | Wit by Margaret Edson | a two hour play about a woman dying from cancer that deals with the significance of choice and teaching and healing in her last hours

a good, long book | Inheritance by Christopher Paolini | as a rule I dislike long books, but Paolini sucks me into his fantasy worlds and I love them so, so much

favorite classic on my shelf | The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde | this play is hilarious and I had to bury my face in my pillow so my laughter wouldn’t wake up my family in the middle of the night. how could I not love it?

via Goodreads
a relatively obscure book | Much Ado About Grubstake by Jean Ferris | it is a ridiculous story because it is the stereotype of every western ever but slightly different but I love it, love it, love it

an underrated book | Twilight by Stephenie Meyer | obviously a ton of people love this book, but as I reread it now I wish more people talked about the Underworld overtones and the good and evil and just be more academic about it

via Goodreads
an overrated book | The Lost Hero by Rick Riordan | the fandom is 32% responsible for ruining Riordan for me. fourteen-year-olds gone wild ruin my Pinterest feed. they think they are so special

most reread book | Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling | it’s sort of disappointing for this to still be true but I don’t think I’ve read any other book more than 24 times

how many of the books you own have you not yet read? | 22 | books don’t get to live on the shelf until I’ve read them, so I make a point of reading the books I own

via Goodreads
a book you haven’t read | How to Read Novels Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster | I really liked his other book and I’ve been meaning to find out more of his thoughts but since he is a guy, I can’t read it yet

a short story collection | Girls to the Rescue! by Bruce Lansky | I have four or five of these collections and they are nice little stories about how girls do awesome things that aren’t always romantically important

a nonfiction book | I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou | turns out my old AP texts can have really interesting sources and this was both beautiful and heartbreaking

via Goodreads
a copy of a book with an interesting story behind it | Sherlock by Jay. | my friend who lives in Japan sent this to his American contacts who sent it to me so I got a random Christmas present in the middle of the year and while I speak no Japanese I think it is super cool to have anyway


Thanks, Liz, this was really fun! For my tags, I tag Grace, Shar or Shanti, and Ashana Lian. Have fun, friends!


Okay, people. Pick two books you own and tell me which categories they would fit into!


6 comments :

  1. Short but powerful book: Sun Horse, Moon Horse by Rosemary Sutcliff. It's historical fiction set in Roman-occupied Britain, and it ends with a human sacrifice (as you do). I own a couple short story collections but my favorites are probably Camelot and Sherwood, both edited by Jane Yolen. I love both King Arthur and Robin Hood, so it's great to read anthologies all about them.

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    1. Well, why wouldn't it end in human sacrifice? I can't think of a good reason. And that's cool! I've always found legends like Arthur and Robin hard to get into since there's no real definition, I guess, but I know Jane Yolen always does awesome work!

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  2. 1000 Children's book you should read before you grow up: obscure book! This is like a goodreads before the internet. Most reread book: Either Harry Potter 5 or Lirael by Garth Nix. I really want to reread the Inheirtance Cycle... I'm planning to do a big discussion post within the next few months about women in fantasy and those ones would probably help me with that! I also LOVE The Importance of being Earnest.

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    1. Huh, that's interesting! Although it is kind of late for me to start reading children's books before I grow up. Awkies. I'd love to read about how you talk about women in fantasy, and I agree, Inheritance Cycle totally would. And yes, Wilde is hilarious. :)

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  3. Oooo thank you for the tag! I might make Shanti do it since I recently did that other post about our bookshelf... Interesting fact: the first time I read Harry Potter it was the sorcerer's stone, because we borrowed it from an American, but ever since then I've only read the Philosopher's stone. A book I haven't read yet: Percy Jackson and the Greek Gods and the Trials of Apollo. I actually started #1 but the fandom is scary (especially because aforementioned (and perhaps rabid) 14 year olds) and I haven't got around to it. One obscure book we have is swallodale, about 4 siblings who spend their summers campin on an island in britain pretending to be pirates. *nods*

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    1. Huh, that's interesting. Does it feel like there's a lot of differences to you reading the British version compared to the American one? I haven't read the Riordan ones, either, although I recently purchased them so I'm going to have to get on it. I do feel for the rabid fandom fears. And that sounds like a fun read! :)

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