Friday, March 4, 2016

One of "Those" Bloggers


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Flickr Credit: Markus Tacker
Maybe this is just me.

I write a post. Sometimes I’m leaking pride out my ears because I love this post so much. Sometimes it is just an average post wrapped neatly in satisfaction. (I try to avoid posting things I’m displeased with. I’m guessing that is a dismal blogger move.)

6 AM arrives the day of, the post goes live, and then comes the waiting.

Waiting waiting waiting waiting waiting waiting waiting waiting waiting.

Because someone might comment on it. And when someone comments on it, it might be someone cool. And by “someone cool,” I mean someone from “that crowd,” the crowd that is cool and awesome and I wish I could be friends with that crowd because then I would be a cool blogger too.

I wait for those people to comment.

I mean, I don’t sit around staring at my inbox all day waiting for comments. That would be an exaggeration. I am in college. I have other blog posts to write. I am trying to edit a novel. Plus my parents ask me to do chores sometimes. Other times I drive to the library.

But still.

When gauging the success of my posts, I spend too much time placing benchmarks on who comments, not how many there are or the quality of those posted. And upon reflection, that doesn’t seem okay to me. It is another dismal blogger move.

In the first place, it suggests that some bloggers are more valuable than others. And while I think it’s fair to say that some comments are more valuable than others and some opinions are more valuable than others, there are not people who are more valuable than others. Thinking that the presence of some people is going to make or break a blog post is stupid—this is the blookunity. If the Duchess of Highhurst doesn’t make it to the party, my reputation shall not suffer.

But not only is this idea a covert way of putting other bloggers down. It is a covert way of putting myself down.

Why aren’t I one of those bloggers? How can I truly value my blog and the work I put into it if I don’t consider it just as worthwhile as every other blog I read? Sure, I have some fixing-up to do—but if I deny my potential entirely, what exactly am I doing here? Commenters are valuable people, but bloggers are valuable people, too. Even if that blogger is me.

My own pride in my work should be a benchmark in the mix. Of course, part of that pride comes from being able to connect with my audience and post things that others will enjoy, but whether a certain person from a certain crowd comments, it shouldn’t matter.

(What is a crowd, anyway? I’ll always associate Pirates of Penzance, Dances with Wolves, and The Princess Bride with one another because they sit on the same shelf in my house, but I bet you don’t. Whoever I consider to be in the cool crowd may not believe they belong to any crowd at all!)

Anyway.

This could just be me. I could just be worrying about something or other from the recesses of my own mind. But even if it is, I like this post the way I wrote it. Likewise, I know I’ll enjoy the conversations I have because of this post, because they’ll all be cool in their own right.

That is all.

What benchmarks do you use to gauge the success of your own blog?


14 comments :

  1. Ooh, I get what you mean, I totally do. I have certain people I hang out for their comments...and get sad if they don't comment. Which is a sad pity party and I agree with you: not healthy! Our success shouldn't really have to weigh on comments. Although I do think comments are a good indication of how well a post went over? But then, honestly, I've written posts that *I* think are really good and that have gotten a dismal amount of comments. And then a half-hearted random post = BOOM = comments everywhere. -_- It's very hard to gauge what's going to make people want to talk.

    I honestly don't even know how I gauge the success of my blog, other than comments. Pageviews? How often it's shared? I definitely feel proud though, when I feel like my graphics have come together nicely and I'm happy with what I wrote. xD

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    1. Yeah, comments are kind of like the stock market. It isn't the economy but if it is tanking it might say something about how the economy is doing. People are just kind of random, though.

      You do have a blog to be proud of! I think your ability to connect with so many people is so great. :)

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  2. Oh, this is so true, and just obsessing over statistics and comments in general takes up SO much of my time (which is annoying). My favourite part is previewing the post and looking at all my photos and being happy with the post I'm sending out. Sometimes I KNOW when a particular post won't get as many views/comments, but often they're some of my favourites.

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    1. Yes! It is nice to look at something you wrote and be like "Yes, that is fiiiine." There is nothing wrong with feeling awesome about your work. Most of my favorite posts are ones I know will breed great conversations, but not always. Sometimes good posts are just good posts, comments or no.

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  3. OMG, I LOVE this post, I did a post called Big Blog vs little blog, and man I hate waiting, I keep hoping, as you do, I try to write terrific posts, and some are better than others. And I totally agree, no one is better than anyone else, but we need more comments and I thank you so much for this post, very well put!!
    http://thebestbasicblogger.blogspot.com/2016/02/big-blog-vslittle-blog.html

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    1. Well, I'm glad you think so. Comments are indicators, people are not. We sort of need to be our own police. Thanks for reading, Joann!

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  4. This is an introspective moment that all bloggers need to have. I went through a period where nobody commented on ANYTHING. It was awful, but I came out of that realizing that a) I need to write quality (not quantity) content, b) a good blogger is a friendly blogger and most importantly, c) my value should be judged myself.

    Great post! Kudos for you for putting your thoughts out there:)

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    1. Yeah, it can be hard to talk about this stuff in public. I think that there are some values in having some quantity—being able to keep a schedule is one of the things that makes my favorite bloggers my favorites—but you're right. Good bloggers are friendly, and that is so important. :) Thanks for reading, Sunny!

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  5. OMG YES. I normally just look at the total comment count, but on a more subjective scale I also get sad if the comments are short or not particularly interesting, and YES I ALWAYS WAIT FOR A COUPLE OF PEOPLE TO COMMENT. And when they don't I start panicking that this post was TERRIBLE even though other equally awesome people commented? And then sometimes a post seems REALLY popular and I'm just like ... hello, I really like the OTHER post more? So it is definitely nerve-wracking.

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    1. Right? If people just say "oh nice post k whatevs" I'm like "WHAT DID I DO WRONG??" I guess it's just that fact that we can't always predict our commenters, and they are their own people, and we should respect that. Even if it is nerve-wracking.

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  6. This is so true. I HATE waiting for people to comment. It's always agonising and I want it. For me, any comments are good but there are always 'those' bloggers who I really want to comment because they are good and I want them to appreciate everything I do. (actually, you're kind of one of them? No pressure though) Arghgh then post's don't get comments and I feel confused and aaaaa. Thanks for your honesty, Heather!

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    1. I know, right? Want want want want want. It would be great if we all had parties of adoring fans who had nothing better to do than shower us with praise, right? XDD (And yeah... I FEEL BAD SOMETIMES BECAUSE I DON'T REALLY COMMENT ON BOOK REVIEWS UNLESS I'VE READ THE BOOK AND SO SOMETIMES I DON'T COMMENT ON YOUR BLOG A LONG TIME AND I FEEL BAD) People are just confusing basically.

      Thanks for yours too, Shar. :)

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  7. The stage where I am now. Though, I don't mind who comments. I just want to see what people like me and what I want to improve on.

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    1. That's a great mindset to have! I hope you keep improving and strengthening your writing. :)

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