Friday, October 30, 2015

WBI Gaston

Lyrics are coming. And Disney owns all of them. Because no one sings like Gaston!

(Also, I just realized, tomorrow is the one year birthday of WBI. Fun stuff.)

via One

WBI Profile


Classification :: Σ1357#*
Role :: Lone Wolf (autonomous villain)
Motivation :: evil (inflating himself at the expense of others), psychology (entitlement), lifestyle (always gets what he wants), personal/material gain (obtaining Belle as his wife)
Bonus :: minions (LeFou), lair (the tavern)

via imgur

A Study


handsome—animators originally had trouble designing Gaston because they’d never drawn a handsome villain before (they solved that problem by the time they made Frozen)

skilled—true to his claims, Gaston is a good hunter, which is how he uses antlers in all of his decorating

vain—at the same time, his skills are non-redeeming; when it comes to Belle, there in town it’s only she who is as beautiful as he, and his egoism and entitlement disgust us more

prejudiced—on top of that, Gaston is condescending, especially to his love interest and her father, not to mention his own sidekick

womanizer—sure, Gaston wants Belle and won’t take no for an answer, but as he says to the other girls, just because he gets married doesn’t mean they’ll end their ren-dez-vouses

conniving—he’s not going to let the consent of one measly woman get in the way of obtaining his trophy wife; likewise, no one plans to persecute harmless crackpots like Gaston

musical—Who has brains like Gaston? Entertains like Gaston? Who can make up these endless refrains like Gaston?

consequentialist—his ends justify his means, so bribing Mssr. D’arque, spying, abducting Belle’s father, and killing the beast are all morally okay with him as long as he gets Belle

cowardly—and despite all his bravado, in the end Gaston begs the Beast like a mewling quim because as much as he desires mercy he never gives it himself (what a jerkface)

fallen—in his selfishness and arrogance Gaston is the cause of his undoing; he falls to his death because his faith in himself becomes his greatest weakness and when he chooses to make himself the most important, he loses the opportunity for group strength (or, y’know, he falls like Satan)

via perezhilton

Big Idea


anyone can be Gaston—the fact that “no one’s slick as Gaston” is rather irrelevant when paired with “every guy here’d like to be you Gaston.” Gaston became the people’s hero, and as soon as people accept the prejudices of their heroes, their relationship with the hero’s enemies becomes one of judgement rather than justice. Which, like this fan theory says, is terrifying to consider.

what’s consent?—I’ve seen it argued that Gaston wasn’t really a villain because his crime was hitting on the girl (maybe the dude didn’t get to the attempted murder at the end?). To be fair, flirting itself isn’t bad, if done right. If we didn’t let other people know we liked them there wouldn’t be relationships. Gaston, however, doesn’t flirt. He expects. He expects Belle to love him, he expects her to marry him, he expects her to satisfy him, and he expects control in the matter. And sure, maybe it’s not the worst thing ever, but if we don’t villainize those who disrespect their love interests and favor entitlement over consent, are we not passively allowing, if not advocating for, such people and behaviors? That ain’t okay.

foiled again—Gaston and Beast are foils. Where Gaston is handsome, Beast is ugly; where Gaston is admired in society, Beast is reviled. But when placed in the same situation, given the chance to value inner beauty over the outer, Gaston ultimately fails where Beast eventually succeeds. Gaston never realizes that selflessness, rather than selfishness, is what creates value in life and love.


I’ve thought in the past that Gaston should have won (he had a firearm, for Pete’s sake, he could have shot Beast from far away), but put in this light, I don’t think Gaston ever would have won. Unless he experienced a change in himself, like Beast, he’d never really achieve the things he doesn’t already have. He’d be static. Forever.

And now: the villain song.


What do you think of Gaston as a villain? How frightening is he compared to other villains? Would you ever write a villain like him?

10 comments :

  1. I really liked this post! Beauty and the Beast is one of my favorites. Gaston is a believable villain who really is all the more creepy for the fact that any of us (to one degree or another) could fill his shoes.

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    1. Right? It's a good movie, but the fact that any of us could be Gaston, or we might admire Gastons, or we might raise Gastons... *shudder* Puts your social life in perspective.

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  2. Happy birthday WBI! Oh, and I ADORED your commentary on this. Like the fact they solved the issue of handsome villains in Frozen. Harmless crackpots. Apologists not getting to the part with attempted murder. AND HAVING A FIREARM. Like totally. Your humour is on point, as is your analysis, as always :D

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    1. Hans, though. *swoons* XD And that is a lyric, so I can't take credit for that, but yeah—I don't really know how one ignores the almost murder of Beast. *sigh* PLUS YEAH GASTON YOU FOOL IF YOU CAN HIT A GOOSE IN THE SKY YOU CAN HIT A BEAST THE SIZE OF A RHINO FORREALZ MAN. Thanks for reading, Alyssa!

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  3. Ooh, fantastic post, Heather. These WBI posts quirk such an interest in me, and considering different angles to villains is so fun, especially when I can be sympathetic to fictional villains on occasion.
    I definitely wouldn't be on board with people saying he wasn't really a threat. Gaston, apart from being something or other bad incarnate, was vicious and cruel and, like you said, expected he had a right to whatever he lay claim to, and that's just as bad as so many other traits villains are paired up with. In certain ways, it could be worse.

    You did a truly fantastic job, Heather! Love this feature- happy anniversary! xx

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    1. Right? I do so love me my villains. :)

      Me neither. I mean, he was not cool, at all, at all, at all. Blah. Like, just because he wasn't Hitler doesn't make him someone we ought to put in a positive light, y'know?

      Thanks for reading, Romi!

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  4. WBI has lasted for so long! I haven't watched Beauty and the Beast (this really should be remedied. It's pretty embarrassing, really) so the main conclusion this has come to is that I had a diene deprived childhood. I do want to watch beauty and the beast though. Also, isn't your blogoversary coming up?

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    1. Oh, you should, and I'd hope you like it. :) And yes, my blogoversary IS coming up, so keep your eyes open!

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  5. Nice post! And Happy birthday WBI!

    I haven't watched Beauty and the Beast in a long time, but I really like your interpretation of Gaston. Especially you're sarcastic commentary. Very nice. :D


    Alexa
    thessalexa.blogspot.com
    verbositybookreviews.wordpress.com

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    1. Oh, yes, it's a good movie, eh? Perhaps you'll see it again soon? Thanks for reading, Alexa!

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